Month: November 2017

Developing Your Drawing Style

    Before I get to the main article I wanted to apologize for not being more active on the site lately. I have been having severe chronic fatigue issues that have sapped my energy to do anything at all, ultimately resulting in a big fat art block. My doctor finally found the issue- a severe sleep apnea. Average 32 breathing stops an hour- yikes! I just started treatment a few days ago and am now have 3 whole days behind me that I didn’t need to take a nap (or two or three). Today I actually felt like getting some art done and catching up on my blog. So here goes~

Finding Your Tribe

Scalped by Jock

    “Finding your tribe” was the term used in a recent workshop to describe finding those artists who influence you – or who you would like to influence you. This was a pretty refreshing concept for me because in art classes I took in the past allowing an artist’s style to influence you was a bad thing. Copying artwork was definitely frowned on. You needed to draw for years and wait patiently for the style fairy to arrive and imbue you with your own amazing uniqueness. Well let me tell you – that is complete and utter crap. Well, for the most part. At the very least, if you want to speed things up, you need to study and copy other artists’ work. 

    It has been said in order to understand our subjects we need to study them. The best way to study a subject is to draw it. Don’t believe me? Take a photo of a subject, then draw it from memory. Now draw a subject. Then attempt to redraw the same subject from memory. I guarantee you will retain information from the subject you drew in much greater detail.  In order to draw the art we want to draw we need to get inside the minds of the artists whose work we admire and define exactly what it is about it that we love. 

    As an exercise, collect works from 3-5 artists you really feel resonates with you/ is in a style that you want to draw like. From that selection of artists find 3-5 pieces of their work that are your absolute favorites. You can do this however you want. I have a Pinterest board of my picks. Because I like the way printed images look on paper, I also bought books and comic books containing my favorite artists’works. (Amazon loves me, my husband is kinda pissed though.)

    Study your images. Make notes about whatyou like about each image. See if you can find out how the images were produced. What media was used? Try to replicate the image. You can do this by copying it as closely as possible or just trying to get the essence of what it is about the image you really like. 

Steal Like an Artist

    You should never plagiarize another artist. If you post your copies someplace then make sure you credit the original artist – and never EVER sell your copied work. That being said this is where the hard work comes in. You still have plenty of drawing to do. All we are really doing here is putting all those ideas in your head about how you want your art to look into focus.

    Drawing is quite literally a map of your central nervous system and your body structure working in tandem. Couple that with your personal preferences and you will produce original artwork unless you are planning a career in art counterfeiting. Remember, you will be referencing several artist’s, not just one. As you are making studies you will see things, even in your absolute favorite artist’s work, that you want to change or improve. You start off asking yourself how would da Vinci draw a subject and over time transition into how you would draw a subject based on observations of da Vinci’s work. That is when you are truly on the path to creating your own style.  

November Art Prompt

It was a hard choice to decide what to draw this month. My initial choice was Victorian cemeteries but we just did Halloween right? So let’s do something off the horror path for a little while and go with fantasy creatures. So some of you might be wondering what some of these creatures look like. Here is a massive list of AD&D monster descriptions. Some have images accompanying. See if you can beat the reference illustrations.